BRING ON THE JOY

BRING ON THE JOY

At this time of year, we’re all a little more reflective—reflective on the past, and indeed, reflecting on how we can project our future, too. I think of all the Christmas antecedents in my own past, and the memories that swirl about begin with the holiday trees my family had, which also reflected progress in many ways.

 

Very on trend, we kept up with the prevailing holiday decor tastes at the time, especially with the JetsonsEsque aluminum trees that were accompanied by a colored light wheel (ranging from red, blue, green, and amber) to change the branches’ colors. That was an early favorite in my household until it wasn’t. Then, the large pine tree emerged, with a wingspan of a double refrigerator and more sparse limbs, leaving room to highlight the significance of favorite ornaments like those from the Seven Dwarfs and the Peanuts Gang.

 

As time marched on, the mighty Douglas Fir trees became adorned with hand-painted wooden ornaments, aptly accessorized with gingham bows and popcorn garland, an austere nod to the hit vintage series, The Walton’s, perhaps? Bidding the somber 70s farewell, with its energy crisis and strikes, with not even a fare-thee-well adieu, the Dynasty-inspired trees would rise to rival any in a department store. They would tower, all glistening in gold and strand-upon-strand of twinkling bright lights, a relatively newish trend then.

 

Of course, the coveted tree would alternate from a spare corner in the den, to a more prominent place in the formal living room for an occasional faux tree, to the front plate glass windows, flanked by taffeta drapes, below a glittering chandelier, that said, Hey hey–look at me. Who could miss it? As the opulent 80s gave way to the more Bada-Bing 90s and 2000s of an amalgamation of themes, sentimental favorites, grandparents’ vintage ornaments, and Christopher Radko collectibles were in vogue, but now like so many things in the world, anything goes. The holidays reflect our own, as well as our families, progress in age, taste, and worldly point of view.

 

The main thing, as I see it in the here and now, is to create lasting memories with loved ones, tree or no tree, especially since the several-year pandemic impeded so many recent holiday plans, and perhaps all year ‘round instead of just these two months ahead. In essence, congratulations on the progress of 2022, for which we are all full of gratitude, and how about we start making those New Year plans ahead of time because 2023 will likely be the most extraordinary year yet. See you around the tree…and in the ballroom.

 

Lance Avery Morgan

Editor-In-Chief &

Creative Director

Lance@SocietyTexas.com

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Portrait photography by Romy Suskin

LARGESSE OBLIGE

LARGESSE OBLIGE

There’s just something about a gala…with so much work that goes into celebrating and supporting an organization for just one night. No gala is perfect mind you, yet I have seen many that have come quite close. I’ll never forget when I donated my time to raise funds as a dancer for the Center For Child Protection’s very first Dancing With The Stars in the mid-2000s. None of my fellow dancers who terpsichored on stage for the maiden voyage of the gala (that now regularly raises well over a million dollars in one evening) knew what to expect while dancing in a ballroom of over a thousand contemporaries.

 

There was one life lesson I acquired in the arduous final days of the months of rehearsing a dance production number that I still think would rival the scope of work of anything you might see on an episode of ABC’s Dancing With The Stars hit series. The lesson was so simple and shared with me by my professional dance partner, who helmed our competitive dance duo. Go out there and do your best. No one in the audience will see you’ve made a mistake…because they don’t know your choreography. It was a pivotal moment that I absorbed and have often applied to life since, and certainly life while chronicling the social scene.

We’ve all attended so many wonderful galas, and some that, well, had the potential to be wonderful. Our cover story feature this month shares an insider’s look at one of the grandest galas in years, Houstonian Becca Cason Thrash’s series of events to support the Musée du Louvre. It has previously occurred mostly in Europe, yet due to the pandemic, she brought the action closer to home, in Los Angeles. “What is so majestic about an event hosted by Becca is that you have the most wonderful mix of familiar faces and interesting people you would never meet otherwise,” noted Society Texas COO Rob Giardinelli, who was in attendance. “The combination of these two elements creates fabulous, unforgettable experiences you will remember for the rest of your life.” It was a three day tour de force of parties and unforgettable rare, private art collection viewings to remember, as you’ll read about and see, which might inspire your own gala planning.

Along with that story, we catch up with another Texas luminary, legendary media professional Neal Spelce. He witnessed and reported on, as much as anyone, many events that have shaped our world. His new book, With The Bark Off, is a true page turner for true Texans. And don’t forget to enjoy our one-of-a-kind feature on fall shoes to set you on the path to fun.

 

Along with our wildly talented lifestyle experts, writers, editors, designers, and publishing teams, we love all things Texan as we continue to celebrate and elevate the finer things in life for you to also enjoy. Now that we’re all back in the saddle this fall season, let’s get out there and be as spectacular as always. Until then, see you in the ballroom.

 

Lance Avery Morgan

Editor-In-Chief &

Creative Director

Lance@SocietyTexas.com

Facebook, Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait photography by Romy Suskin

FOCUS & FLOW

FOCUS & FLOW

Where focus goes, energy flows. It’s a physics law that we well understand here, thanks to our talented team who make the wheels turn in the engine to create and produce the Society Texas print magazine, its digital brother, and a host of social media outlets.

 

This summer, the first one in years of feeling free again post-pandemic, we all have a sense of feeling unleashed and rarin’ to go for good times ahead. In fact, that started this spring across the state, and we are very proud to present a look at how so many philanthropies have made a difference in their communities and beyond. Many are newer organizations, and some are over a century old, such as San Antonio’s weeks-long Fiesta celebrations. We salute Fiesta, which is steeped in a long line of Texas tradition, in this issue with an homage to this year’s Order Of The Alamo coronation court, themed The Court Of The Grand Tour. The gowns and accoutrement are a year in the making, and you can bet that 2023’s outfits are already being designed and made to behold next year. Fiesta is one of those Texas legacies that is a culmination of biography, behavior, and backstory….one that we appreciate greatly.

 

Socially, the sheer fact is philanthropists have made up for lost time (even though donations were generous during the pandemic) in giving back. A gala that raises $10, 11, or even 12 million in one evening, thanks to its spirited patrons, isn’t rare anymore and happens in almost every single major city that we cover. The work that happens behind the scenes of the talented organizations, who create the gala experience are to be commended, for they are tireless and often not rewarded. We proudly salute them in every issue.

 

As the summer progresses, If you’re like us, you’ve been up to your necks in planning several warm weather excursions. One of our favorites is Budapest, which Ashley Dobson so eloquently helps unfold with her many insights of VIP things to do when you get there. You’ll want to travel in style, so why not grab a new handbag for the trip, with our inspiring feature on the prettiest ones in this issue? Plus, all of our talented team have again assembled to bring you as much lifestyle, fashion, beauty, automotive, and cultural insight and how-tos on every single page of this issue. We hope it inspires you as much as it does us. 

 

So, from beach to mountains, we’re with you every step of the way until we meet again in the ballroom. Happy travels for a sensational rest of the summer.

 

Lance Avery Morgan

Editor-In-Chief &

Creative Director

Lance@SocietyTexas.com

Facebook, Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait photography by Romy Suskin

JUST PICTURE IT

JUST PICTURE IT

As the seeds were planted and the stars aligned, welcome to our annual Art+Jewelry issue. For admirers and collectors of both, we realize that both canvas and carats can each be very subjective. Jewelry is always a correct choice, and spoiler alert: in 2023, when the remake of 1963’s Cleopatra, starring Gal Gadot, debuts, expect a flurry of massive jewels to become more popular than ever. Plus, the old adage art is long, life is short, seems more accurate than ever thanks to the ongoing robust interest in traditional art, and its newcomer little sister, NFT (Nonfungible Tokens) digital art bought with cryptocurrency. Both have set the auction and technology worlds on fire. With records continuing to be surpassed in both realms, collectors can continue to be buckled in for the wild rides ahead.

Recently, while screening the new series on Netflix, The Andy Warhol Diaries, based on the 80s bestseller, it’s remarkable how much has changed in the contemporary art world of Warhol’s day and how much it has well, not. After all, deep down, don’t we all want to discover The Next Big Thing,f ind artful pieces we can’t live without, and perhaps have an option of a potential return on the investment if we should decide to sell? Investment in art is the most subjective shell game there is. The advice from most collectors and gallerists? Buy what you love. Rinse and repeat. In fact, I’d wager to predict that in our era of when a moment can become a movement, expect the digital NFT art realm to explode with lucrative possibilities to own and track the provenance of future masterpieces. In that case, in a twist of events, life would imitate art instead of the other way around. And, it would make for one heck of a movement.

In this issue, as we move forward and summer refreshes us with sun-drenched opportunities, you’ll see plenty of shining examples of optimistically vibrant art, jewelry, fashion, and stylish ways of living your best life as things get back to normal again. Spending time with family, friends and traveling to make up for the lost time becomes a priority.

Additionally, our feature on the French Riviera by Ashley Dobson should inspire your Mediterranean desires like never before. We’re confident your summer will be all that you want it to be, from pool to coast to exploring foreign ports of call. So, be sure to pack an issue of Society Texas with you to stay in the know. The first one into the water gets to yell Marco Polo. We’ll see you at the swim-up bar. 

 

Lance Avery Morgan

Editor-In-Chief &

Creative Director

Lance@SocietyTexas.com

Facebook, Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait photography by Romy Suskin

HOW TO SHOW UP FOR TRUE AUTHENTICITY

HOW TO SHOW UP FOR TRUE AUTHENTICITY

Most of us can utilize the life, executive, leadership, and personal transformational coaching that our new business and life coach columnist Angie McCourt offers. Here, she shares her insight on how we can embrace our true, stylish authenticity…in the office and beyond.

GIVE YOURSELF PERMISSION

In my book, Love Your Gifts: Permission to Revolutionize Authenticity in the Workplace, I target the many limitations that can impact how we show up in the workplace as our authentic selves. These constraints can impact our elevated gifts and deter us from reaching our full potential. So, let’s see how to clear out what isn’t working, so we can activate these innate gifts.

The clearing out involves reducing and eventually eliminating judgments, comparisons, competing in unhealthy ways, limiting beliefs, overcompensating, and our inner critic. This also applies to our authenticity in personal relationships, with friends, the community, on social media, our spirituality, and within our families. In fact, if we are not feeling connected to our authentic selves, it may be causing a disconnect from our joy, which can affect our interactions with others or in a desire to be fully ourselves, speak our truth, show up in our authentic skin, and showcase our gifts and talents. It can also affect our style, taste in food, art, and décor in this drive to be our authentic selves. 

We are often influenced by others, including friends, colleagues, and current trends, regarding what we should wear, eat, support, and appreciate. However, these areas are a great place to be your authentic self. Today many people wear clothes based on their mood, type of activity, or how they want to show up versus being influenced by others. We see fashion trends shifting everywhere compared to 10 to 20 years ago when they were very predictable.

Instead, many people today wear clothes based on their mood, type of activity, or how they want to show up versus being influenced by others. We listen to different types of music based on how we feel or want to feel. We view jewelry as symbolic and even as wearable art showcasing it according to how we wish to present ourselves. The style each of us has is becoming more about our individuality than how others expect us to be or how others are showing up.  To be authentic is not to try to be different but to be in the truth of what you enjoy, doing what best represents who you are, your values, beliefs, and desires.

There is often a fear of judgment, rejection, or disapproval based on our status, job, title, or responsibilities that hold us back from being our authentic selves. Take a moment to think about the unique qualities you have and don’t share with others and ask yourself why not? This specialness might be a talent, interest, gift, or even a parenting role.

We struggle between sharing too much about ourselves out of fear this knowledge will be held against us somehow, which leads to unhappiness and disconnection. So, do what feels comfortable by allowing your authenticity to shine when you show up.

THE MAGIC OF THREES

Try these three exercises to allow yourself to break through the blocks that may be holding you back from bringing your authentic self into your everyday life. 

 

  1. Assess your values (what are the top five values you live by today?) and fully align to them throughout all areas of your life.
  2. Discover two limiting beliefs restricting your authenticity (Example: You are expected to show up in a certain way, or others won’t respect you.) Challenge the truth of those beliefs. When has this happened in the past? What happens if the limiting beliefs are not accurate? Then, write your new truth statement.
  3. Stop comparing yourself to others. This can be easier said than done, and it takes self-awareness to catch when this is happening. Reducing time on social media can help. Be grateful for what you have, who you are, and who is in your life currently. Support others in their success, too.

Then, check in with yourself regularly to see how you connect with your authentic self and what that looks and feels like. Finally, acknowledge how your authenticity influences the impact you can make at home, work, in the community, and the world.

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