BELIEVE ALL THE HYPE

BELIEVE ALL THE HYPE

Now that the world is returning to normal, more than ever, the fashion collections featured some rather bold colors…and this summer’s looks are showing some of the most daring hues yet. Brighten your closet and outlook with these mood-boosting hyper colors that reach across all styles and silhouettes, according to our style reporters Krystal De Lisi and Ellen Mason, founders of THE EDIT ADVISORY.

HYPER PINK

With Millennial Pink having left the building, we can move onto other vibrant shades of the magnificent color pink. From cotton candy to fuchsia, think pink like never before. It’s the pretty and feminine pick-me-up we all want.

 

As Seen On: Proenza Schouler, Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton, as well as Paris and Milan street style.

 

 

HYPER YELLOW

From sunflower to lemons, yellow is a happy color that perks up any outfit. Head to toe, yellow makes a cheerful statement that invites compliments and second looks. You’ll see.

 

As Seen On: Prada, COS, Valentino, Vetements, Undercover, Arteprima, and Richard Quinn.

 

 

HYPER TURQ

Torq your turq. Turquoise, that is. It’s easily the cheeriest shade of blue in the universe, don’t you think? From Santa Fe to all points beyond, the re-discovered hue is making its mark as the best focus color of any spring ensemble. It’s perfect to accessorize with, too.  

 

As Seen On: Nina Ricci, Giada, Isabel Marant, as well as Copenhagen and Milan street style.

 

 

HYPER LIME

And you thought lime green was a color only a grandmother could love. Freshly picked from the runway trees, this vibrant green says hello, I’m here like no other in the color spectrum.

 

As Seen On: Versace, Emilio Pucci, MSGM, Shang Xia, David Korma, and Emilia Wickstead.

GARDEN EXPLOSION

Another trend that embodies the triumphant return of spring is the use of vibrant, large-scale floral prints. Unlike the muted pastels of previous spring collections, these florals are colorful, oversized, and often kaleidoscopic in nature. Beyond enlarged flowers, unique patterns are created by magnifying a single petal or stem. 

 

Key Details: Head-to-toe looks that make you feel like you are literally wrapped in flora and the occasional fauna. This is not the ditsy floral print made popular by the Cottagecore trend. These are oversized, large-scale bursts of flowers and colors. Garden fauna prints included butterflies and dragonflies, magnifying a single wing to create a unique print.

 

As Seen On: Chanel, Gucci, Oscar de la Renta, Marc Cain, and Schiaparelli

METAL GLAM

Designers celebrated the return of the runway with looks that borrowed from glamrock fashions of the past while retaining a bit of the post-apocalyptic feel that has been prevalent since the pandemic began. With the sequin, the glam comes. From metallic materials to sophisticated metal details, the combination of mixed metal-earth tones and sparkly neutrals create an overall palette that is both grounded and sparkly. Key Details: This trend evokes everything from the big hair, glam rock bands of the 1980s to the supermodel-filled Versace collections of the 1990s. There are also hints of 1970s disco, 1980s punk, and the multi-decade use of fringe. Designers also used a lot of pleating and cutouts in gleaming, sometimes foil-like textiles.   

 

As Seen On: Balmain, Christopher Kane, Givenchy, Lanvin, and Courreges

ULTRA SPORT LUXE

True performance-based, activewear staples are given the fashion treatment with puffed sleeves, refined cutouts, sophisticated colors, color blocking, and retro athletic details. The inspiration for this trend goes well beyond Barre, HIIT, or other gym activities. These collections are based on extreme, ultra-sports, but it is indeed fashion. 

 

Key Details: Look for this trend to be everywhere, but called something different, probably with “core” attached. ActiveCore, PerformanceCore, Peak PerformanceCore, UltraCore, or UltraActiveCore, to name a few. The trend also has fun playing with the extreme juxtaposition of two pieces you would not normally style together. Go beyond denim and pearls and opt for a weatherproof poncho and Louboutin stilettos look.

 

As Seen On: Tom Ford, Louis Vuitton, Stella McCartney, MSGM, and Nikolaj Storm

SPRING’S TRIUMPHANT RETURN

SPRING’S TRIUMPHANT RETURN

Spring is the season of rebirth, and there’s no slow, gentle awakening this year. In fact, the Spring/Summer 2022 designer collections are bursting with vibrancy and optimism for the future while still including small nods to nostalgic influences of the past, according to our trendsetters, THE EDIT ADVISORY’S Krystal DeLisi and Ellen Mason. 

BOLD PUNCHY BRIGHTS

Nowhere is this bold and bright reemergence seen more than in the bright-on-bright, even neon-on-neon designs that graced the runways. We saw Bold Blocking as a new way of Power Dressing by combining intense colors with a modern take on 1980s power suiting.

 

Key Details: Pair these powerful colors with equally powerful silhouettes such as strong shoulders, authoritative pencil skirts, and wide-leg trousers. Many designers used unexpected materials, such as sequins, in their Bold Blocking for a hint of sparkle to further punch up your brights.

 

As Seen On: Dior, Versace, Sandro, Eudon Choi, and Gestuz

GARDEN EXPLOSION

Another trend that embodies the triumphant return of spring is the use of vibrant, large-scale floral prints. Unlike the muted pastels of previous spring collections, these florals are colorful, oversized, and often kaleidoscopic in nature. Beyond enlarged flowers, unique patterns are created by magnifying a single petal or stem. 

 

Key Details: Head-to-toe looks that make you feel like you are literally wrapped in flora and the occasional fauna. This is not the ditsy floral print made popular by the Cottagecore trend. These are oversized, large-scale bursts of flowers and colors. Garden fauna prints included butterflies and dragonflies, magnifying a single wing to create a unique print.

 

As Seen On: Chanel, Gucci, Oscar de la Renta, Marc Cain, and Schiaparelli

METAL GLAM

Designers celebrated the return of the runway with looks that borrowed from glamrock fashions of the past while retaining a bit of the post-apocalyptic feel that has been prevalent since the pandemic began. With the sequin, the glam comes. From metallic materials to sophisticated metal details, the combination of mixed metal-earth tones and sparkly neutrals create an overall palette that is both grounded and sparkly. Key Details: This trend evokes everything from the big hair, glam rock bands of the 1980s to the supermodel-filled Versace collections of the 1990s. There are also hints of 1970s disco, 1980s punk, and the multi-decade use of fringe. Designers also used a lot of pleating and cutouts in gleaming, sometimes foil-like textiles.   

 

As Seen On: Balmain, Christopher Kane, Givenchy, Lanvin, and Courreges

ULTRA SPORT LUXE

True performance-based, activewear staples are given the fashion treatment with puffed sleeves, refined cutouts, sophisticated colors, color blocking, and retro athletic details. The inspiration for this trend goes well beyond Barre, HIIT, or other gym activities. These collections are based on extreme, ultra-sports, but it is indeed fashion. 

 

Key Details: Look for this trend to be everywhere, but called something different, probably with “core” attached. ActiveCore, PerformanceCore, Peak PerformanceCore, UltraCore, or UltraActiveCore, to name a few. The trend also has fun playing with the extreme juxtaposition of two pieces you would not normally style together. Go beyond denim and pearls and opt for a weatherproof poncho and Louboutin stilettos look.

 

As Seen On: Tom Ford, Louis Vuitton, Stella McCartney, MSGM, and Nikolaj Storm

BRIGHT FUTURE AHEAD

BRIGHT FUTURE AHEAD

With the world vigorously coming back to life, one of the things we are most excited to see return are weddings. With weddings come honeymoons. And with honeymoons come travel wardrobes. As the top trends from the recent women’s wear 2022 runways have shown us, fashion is answering that call with a brighter, more contemporary take on fashions. THE EDIT ADVISORY’s Krystal De Lisi and Ellen Mason share their favorite finds.

TREND: RETRO RESORT VIBE

Description: A fresh take on the most nostalgic vacation-ready looks. While many resort trends pretend to be somewhat on the clock, Retro Resort is unabashedly Out Of Office.

Key Details: Hot pants, short shorts, and mini-skirts. Bandeaus, as well as bra and bikini-inspired tops, will be a hit. Look for hypnotic swirls, psychedelic paisleys, and retro florals. Coverups are evocative of the 60s and 70s caftans. This is also a great trend to play with scarves worn as tops, sarongs, or headdresses.

As Seen On: Pucci, Lanvin, Balmain, and Stella McCartney.

Destinations: Palm Springs, Miami, and The Azores.

TREND: CUT IT OUT, ALREADY

Description: Body-baring and confident, this trend redefines sexy by highlighting collarbones, shoulders, and sides. In fact, it speaks to both comfort and confidence.

Key Details: Cut-outs, crops, open backs, and asymmetrical necklines. Look for body-hugging knits and other body-con fashions in travel-friendly materials.

As Seen On: Victoria Beckham, Burberry, Diotima, and David Koma.

Destinations: Ibiza, Bora Bora, Nice, and Saint Tropez.

TREND: MODERN COLLEGIATE

Description: The traditional school uniform-inspired looks injected with hints of optimism with its use of vibrant color. Borrowed from the boys made feminine with pops of pink, eye-catching florals, and modernized rugby stripes.

Key Details: Letterman jackets, varsity sweaters, and vests. Look for collegiate stripes and color-blocked neon with moments of neutral to ground the look. Form-hugging hot pants and leggings join tennis skirts and preppy outerwear.

As Seen On: Givenchy, Salvatore Ferragamo, and Sacai.

Destinations:  Martha’s Vineyard, Boston, Paris, and Milan.

TREND: RAINBOW BRIGHTS

Description: The most overt happy dressing for a post-pandemic ethos, this trend features 60s and 70s, mod to groovy vibes with a dash of 80s optimism. While it is possible to style bright colors for hotter temps, the collections were full of cold weather fashions in these vivid hues.

Key Details: The brighter, the better, as this trend is all about color. Look for color-blocked knits in playful color combinations. Also, look for all-over prints, oversized stripes, oversaturated colors, bright neons, and tie-dye fashions. A more colorful take on graphics and logos will be seen in everything from tee-shirts to tote bags.  

As Seen On: Coach, Christophers John Rogers, and Marina Mascone.

Destinations: Reykjavík, Aspen, and St. Moritz.

SPARKLE MORE

SPARKLE MORE

With time off from holiday dressing last year, we’re back in the saddle now and bringing more shine and sparkle to our essence. Here, our new column, THE EDIT ADVISORY, with Krystal De Lisi and Ellen Mason,  spotlights the trends you’ll want to know.

Trend: Life’s a Party. The party has not stopped. It just looks different.

Description: The rise and rebirth of occasion wear and dress-up clothes. If life on lockdown has taught us anything, it’s life is a party worth dressing for…even, if it’s a party of one. These looks allow us to transcend daily life and make every day a special event. In the immortal words of Audrey Hepburn, “Life’s a party. Dress for it.”     

Key Details: Dresses, dresses, and more dresses. High shine finishes, glittery details, glossy metallics, iridescent fabrics, and over-the-top embellishments. There was a definite theme of the Roaring 20s version 2.0. The 1920s were all about glitz and glamour with an underlying movement toward simplicity in dress. The current looks reinterpret much of this philosophy.

As Seen On: Chanel, Naeem Khan, Lanvin, and Markarian

Celebration: New Year’s Eve in Paris, the office party…even if it’s on Zoom, a fancy holiday meal, or cocktails.

Trend: Female Power Renaissance. A new dawn of the ultra-feminine aesthetic.

Description: Body-baring and confident, this trend is redefining sexy by highlighting collarbones, shoulders, and sides. This look is all about highlighting the feminine form in unexpected ways with sleek silhouettes that are body-skimming more than body con. Women-defined sexy that is subtle yet more powerful than previous seasons.   

Key Details: Out are ruffles, frills, poofy skirts, and in-your-face femininity. In is sheer cutouts, bras, and bandeaus, and strength. Hot pants and corset details in everything from patent leather to velvet. High neck and maxi-length silhouettes are made sexy with the use of sheer and lace panels.

As Seen On: Dolce & Gabbana, Schiaparelli, Sportmax, and Rokh

Celebration: Anything with your girls. New Year’s Eve in Las Vegas, or cocktails.  

Trend: Down-To-Earth. Grounded inspiration with an elevated twist.

Description: These looks embrace the duality of cozy luxury. An essential yet adaptable wardrobe with pieces that can be dressed up or down in colors and fabrics inspired by nature. Rooted in ease and relaxation, there is a no-fuss vibe even when sequins are involved. Form and function, this trend must be comfortable, polished, and useful. And must have pockets.  

Key Details: Ground unique pieces with basics: Sequins and denim, tulle and linen, knits and satin. Look for loose-fitting trousers, jeans, joggers, and skirts. Layer different textures to bring visual interest to simple, even monochromatic looks.

As Seen On: Giorgio Armani, Louis Vuitton, Maison Mai, and Christian Dior

Celebration: Snowy holidays on the East Coast, cozy at-home meals with the family, caroling, tree trimming, and casual cocktails with neighbors.

Trend: The Future is Green. A color that represents tranquility, luck, and health.

Description: Verdant hues and frondescent prints that reflect our need to bring the outdoors in. It is also a literal manifestation of the need for sustainable clothing and a cleaner fashion industry. 

Key Details: Olive is a key shade in this trend. Also called army green, these camo shades, along with military details, reflect the regimented times in which they were designed. Misty shades or winterized pastels like seafoam or sage were also popular. 

As Seen On: Temperley London, Balmain, Givenchy, and Simone Rocha

Celebration: Holiday traditions, an extravagant hotel holiday brunch, a Saturday matinee of The Nutcracker, and yes, cocktails.