FLAVORS THAT FLOURISH

FLAVORS THAT FLOURISH

Fall into more fun, we say. Our editors Lesa Rossick in Austin, Cynthia Smoot in Dallas, Jennifer Roosth in Houston, and Eleanora Morrison in San Antonio share their stellar statewide recommendations that are must-dines as the weather cools down.

AUSTIN

EVER EASTSIDE

La Corsha Hospitality Group has exceeded all expectations with the East Austin Hotel. Sixth and Waller, a counter style restaurant headed by Chef Jason Stude, offers a poolside bar and The Upside rooftop bar that are all perfect spots to relax with a cocktail and delicious eats. At EastAustinHotel.com

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT

Kyoten Sushiko, the beloved sushi spot, has been reopened into a more intimate, omakase-only restaurant. Enjoy a front-row experience as you watch your meal being prepared by the chef, down to the most intricate, delicious detail. At KyotenSushiko.com

ASIAN? SWEET.

Sugar Pine is the new, cheerful eatery that has arrived in North Austin with homemade ice cream, pastries, Onigiri, and so many appetizers. The delicious Bento Boxes are a great option…ranging from grilled salmon to Chicken Karaage. At SugarPineATX.com

DALLAS / FORT WORTH

IRISH SWEEPSTAKES

Cannon’s Corner Irish Pub is located inside one of Oak Cliff’s oldest and most historic buildings and offers diners a traditional Irish pub experience. Their menu features a wide range of items from hardy starters, sandwiches, and salads and a must-try traditional Irish stew. You can also enjoy a large selection of Irish beers with more than 25 on tap, 200 Irish whiskies and scotches. At CannonsIrishPub.com Photo by Kathy Tran

REALLY, IT’S SCIENCE

Beto & Son is the chef-inspired new generation of Mexican restaurant in Trinity Groves that has become quite a popular destination. With tableside-crated liquid Nitrogen margaritas, the fresh farm-to-table ingredients and the warm environment, it’s a spot to which you’ll want to return often. At BetoAndSon.com

NOW THAT’S ITALIAN

Recently opened in the Plaza at Preston Center, il Bracco offers a fresh take on classic Italian dishes with everything made from scratch including breads, pastas, and sauces. The fresh fish is delivered daily and all proteins are butchered on-site and offered on an impressively high quality, crave-able and everyday accessible menu. The chic, but comfortable environment with excellent service and hospitality is a core emphasis At IlBraccoRestaurant.com

HOUSTON

LOCH IT IN

Located in the heart of River Oaks District, Loch Bar is Atlas Restaurant Group’s classic seafood tavern with a speakeasy twist. It serves oceanic dishes synonymous with Houston’s cuisine and curates one of the city’s largest raw bars. In addition to offering a wide selection of local craft beers and handcrafted cocktails, the beverage program centers around one of the city’s largest whiskey lists. At LochBar.com

HUSTLE YOUR BUSTLE

Houston insiders know what a gem Nancy’s Hustle is. Burgers with English muffins instead of a bun? Yes, please. It’s a modern bistro and wine bar on Houston’s east side. With simple fare in mind, they like butter, natural wine, cider, and cocktails that pair well with food. At NancysHustle.com

HEAVENS TO BETSY’S

Located inside the beloved Yellow House at the southwest corner of Evelyn’s Park in the Bellaire neighborhood, Betsy’s offers not only fast casual dining, but also features outdoor grill nights, movies on the lawn, pop up events, and unique workshops.  At BetsysBellaire.com

SAN ANTONIO

CLEAN CUISINE

Founded by Chef Elizabeth Johnson, Pharm Table is the mastermind behind what is arguably the only anti-inflammatory restaurant of its kind. Pharm Table embodies its anti-inflammatory menu with the amazing ability to traverse the nuances of today’s fad diets but also deliver the staying power of centuries-old cultural diets like Ayurvedic and Blue Zones. At PharmTable.com

BREAD WINNERS

Brothers José and David Cáceres’ passion for baking at La Panadería began when they were young boys selling their mother, Doña Josefina’s fresh baked bread on the streets of Mexico City. Eventually they took over their mother’s homegrown business and started baking on a larger scale, supplying bread and pan dulce for businesses throughout Mexico. After finding success in Mexico, the brothers realized they wanted to get back to the basics, and decided to bring their passion for bread culture to Texas. At LaPanaderia.com

THAT’S AMORE

Located in both Olmos Park and on San Antonio’s North Side, Pesto Ristorante was recently opened by Chef Alejandro Santoyo, who mastered his craft for 18 years in the kitchen of local favorite, Paesano’s restaurant. The restaurant, aptly named for Chef Alex Santoyo’s love of European cuisines, is primarily focused on  Italian cuisine. The perfected recipes crafted with pesto have infused native Mexican flavors with tastes that evoke his own authentic flare. At Pesto-Ristorante.com

IF THE SHOE FITS

IF THE SHOE FITS

Our Native Texan style bon vivant Gordon Kendall, who spends plenty of time in Manhattan, recalls his encounter being photographed by the late Bill Cunningham of the much beloved New York Times’ On The Street fashion column.

 

We all have our quirks. I’m a “shoe guy” and always have been. Judging from the number of other well-shod gents I see; I know I’m not alone. It won’t, then, come as a surprise that I’ve ended up with lots of shoes: sneakers, loafers, slip-ons, sandals, boots, drivers. Over time, though, my shoes have done more than just get me fashionably from one place to another: they have become my calling card, introductions to new friends and invitations to unexpected fun. My shoes have even helped me step into fashion near immortality.

 

I got to thinking about that recently after receiving a copy of Fashion Climbing: A Memoir with Photographs, by the late Bill Cunningham, of The New York Times’ Style section, photographer of On the Street and Evening Hours. One of fashion’s legendary photographers, he was at every fashion and fashion-able event in New York City for decades, camera at the ready, clad in his signature blue workman’s jacket with multiple pockets to house his camera gear, no matter how swank the affair. His images captured not always the entire person, yet perhaps a specific item of clothing, accessory, or piece of jewelry that captured his unlimited imagination and fashion knowledge. It was this very sense of having caught the master’s eye that came to mean the unseen, sometimes unnamed wearer had gotten it just right. So much so, I have no doubt there are fashion-striving New Yorkers who can attest to sunburns and chilblains from having consistently waited at the corner of Fifth Avenue around East 57th Street for Bill Cunningham to pass by on his bike and take their picture.

 

Gala partygoers were no better. At one event, an entire table fell silent as a mysterious hand reached over to touch the sleeve of one lady’s rather fabulous Oscar de la Renta gown, camera poised. How could anyone talk, when we were all holding our collective breaths, trying to photobomb the moment? But such was Cunningham’s skill at controlling the setting and the subject that no attempt worked. Especially my own. As it turned out, I had only to wait. I recall a February snow lay in thigh-high berms dotted up and down Seventh Avenue, approaching Chelsea. The sidewalks were a wet mess, but the jaunt from the subway-to-another event was short and I buy my shoes to wear, not decorate my closet. How could I forget how I was shod late that day? It was the Sloane, Glitter Slip-On, by Jimmy Choo. If Darth Vader ever attended the opera, these would be his kicks: covered in sparkling black crystals, its dark, glossy textured surface catching the light, highlighting each step with shine. I had just entered the venue, standing in the lobby, when I felt it. The hand, that hand, at my shoulder. It was him.

 

This is what I recall from that near minute, I admit, my only one ever, with Bill Cunningham. Turning towards him, watching his camera go ever downward, aiming past the evening jacket, ignoring everything else until it focused on the shoe toe. He shot just that one detail. Nothing else. He then asked who made…not “did”…the shoe. I could only stammer, “Choo. Jimmy Choo.” Then, just in case it wasn’t obvious, I added: “…but the feet are mine.” I recall walking on air the entire evening after that.

 

My shoes: past, present, and future. I don’t know where they’ll take me, or whom I will meet in them. But one special pair enabled this unabashed shoe guy to step, however briefly, into fashion’s most famous flash.

           

LET ME ENTERTAIN YOU

LET ME ENTERTAIN YOU

Homeware,  clothing designer and entrepreneur Kate Hersh of August Morgan has a fanciful sense of humor that’s made her designs a colossal hit. She sat down as our guest on the Success With Style podcast series with co-hosts Rob Giardinelli and Lance Avery Morgan to discuss entertaining in style.

Photography courtesy of August Morgan

Preppie godmother of the 1960s and mad-for-paisley designer Lilly Pulitzer would be proud of her post millennium spirit animal Kate Hersch. What started as an obsession with vintage needle point pillows has evolved into a budding enterprise for Hersch, a busy mother of two, and founder of Austin-based August Morgan, and is thoughtfully turning into well, a potential lifestyle empire.

It seemed simple in the early 2000s when Hersch confidently charged ahead to make the world a more beautiful place. It started out with repurposing grandmother’s embroideries and placing them onto pillows, ottomans and room divider screens. Then, ever the consummate hostess, Hersch mastered the duality of irreverence, intermixed with elegance, by producing a delightful line of hand-embroidered linen cocktail napkins, perfect for any and every occasion.

Double entendre bon mots like No Straw Needed, On A Long Leash, Owl Have Another, and dozens more, started the craze so that every stylish home might be seemingly incomplete without a set­–or eight. Luxe stores like Neiman Marcus, Barney’s, The Breakers, and The Menagerie came knocking to stock her quirky point of view of the 50 different styles and sales have been climbing. “Not everyone is comfortable at a cocktail party, so the napkins are designed to be a conversation starter, as well as a hostess gift,” shares Kate Hersch. Then, creative vision intact, she added a line of stemless cocktail glasses with similar clever sayings.

Now, she’s designing casual clothing because, as she states, ”I knew there was a better and stylish answer to the athleisurewear you see everywhere now.” Whew. The line of easy breezy tops, scarves, pajamas, caftans, and sleek shift dresses have been a Palm Beach-meets-Palm Springs hit and if you see a Texas lass sporting newly chic and bright attire, it might likely be an August Morgan creation. “Essentially, they are for the women who would understand my napkins.”

Hersch spent her early career years working for Sotheby’s Auction House after graduating from The University of Texas and shares, “It was like going to graduate school because I sat through all the auctions, so I learned so much about silver, African art, you name it.” When we ask her if it’s aided her design sensibility, she says, “It did. And, I also think that people who sort of get me, get my stuff I create. Those crazy, crazy people.”

Tongue planted firmly in chic, she likes to say that August Morgan was born in New York City, but was raised in Austin, where she now lives in a Gatsby-eque West Austin home that she’s re-done from top to bottom. At work, from a downtown atelier in the heart of the city, it’s all business. Hersch and her team always seem to be filling the endless orders from web commerce and retailers, as well as attending design gift market shows across the country. From word of mouth to a robust social media presence where consumers can click and buy something that they love immediately has been, as Hersch states, “a game changer to the business.”

Her goal for the brand as it grows is to be in more retail markets like New Orleans, Charleston, and other like-minded cities known for gracious entertaining. That is likely the secret to Kate Hersch’s vision for long term success with August Morgan, “It’s a thoughtfulness and also, you know, it’s the aesthetic that is pretty, southern, and colorful. I like fun energy and I always believe in not taking yourself too seriously.”

SOCIAL CUES

SOCIAL CUES

As our social obligations increase this time of year, it may seem like we have less time for the niceties of life. However, according to our Ms. Modern Mannners Sharon Schweitzer, J.D., here are some ways to be more thoughtful about those around us.  

 

Dear Ms. Modern Manners,

Our upcoming travels are taking us on a European river cruise where we will delight in culture and devour goodies while wandering through the regions’ markets. What is the best way to politely barter while attending these markets?

Packed With Passport

Dear Packed & Ready,

Ensure you do your research on the specific cultural norms in each of the countries that you will be visiting on your cruise. Learn if bartering is indeed culturally appropriate in particular provinces. If so, incorporate the three P’s into your bartering strategy: personable, polite and private. Don’t reveal how much you are willing to spend, be friendly and always utilize kindness. Respect is universally understood.

 

Dear Ms., Modern Manners,                                                                                                               
I work in a small office and I adore my colleagues. My wedding has been a major topic of conversation between them, it seems. Do I have to invite everyone?                                                                    

Marrying Soon

Dear Married In The Future,

In the U.S., at the heart of every guest list is a congenial, compatible group of people. If you are friends with your coworkers and are social together, then it is appropriate to extend an invitation. If you are only inviting select coworkers to your wedding, you may discreetly ask them to keep it quiet at the office or workplace. You are in the best position to know whether this will remain quiet. Avoid being surprised when word of the guest list leaks out as it usually does. 

If you do wish to invite colleagues, consider the option of having a standby list or a “B” list. If you have a limited number of guest spots, send the “Save The Date” communication several months or a year in advance to the priority or “A” list Then, send the “official invitation” (by mail, website, or email). When the RSVP deadline arrives, have a friend or family member designated to begin the process of contacting and following-up with all guests who haven’t RSVP’d. Today, guests often fail to RSVP.

After the “A” list has been confirmed, extend invitations to colleagues on the “B” list if space is available. Be sure to wait until all “A” list guests have been contacted or confirmed. In some cultures, like much of Latin AmericaAsia, and specifically India, the social obligation is much stronger to include colleagues, leadership and supervisors, and business associates―including those of the bride and grooms’ parents. Depending on the culture and customs, social ramifications for failing to invite coworkers may cause a loss of face for both parties, and or personal offense. 

 

Dear Ms. Modern Manners,

Just when I think I’ve figured out modern dating, all these new terms surface. I think I know what “ghosting” is, but how do I know if I’ve been “uncuffed” or if I’ve “benched” someone?

Dating Awkwardly

Dear Awkwardly Seeking,

Modern dating is complicated enough without all of these new words for how a date may conceivably disappear from the scene. Let’s define a few terms that indicate that you just aren’t that into him. Keep in mind that from an etiquette standpoint doing any of these things demonstrates a lack of maturity and poor communication skills. Hopefully you aren’t dating anyone who does this…

Benching is when you like your date well enough to keep seeing them, but not so much that you want to “lock it down with them.” So, you keep your options open with them while continuing to date around.

Cuffing is short for handcuffing someone you have been seeing. Winter is viewed as “cuffing” season when the romantic holidays occur and cooler weather encourages couples to stay indoors binge-watching shows and cuddling together. Being “uncuffed” means you are now single.

Ghosting occurs when your friend or the person you’re dating suddenly cuts off all communication with you, with zero warning or notice before hand, hoping they will get the hint that they’re no longer interested. A ghoster will avoid one in public while simultaneously ignoring their phone calls, texts and on social media. It’s extremely confusing for the recipient.

Breadcrumbing is the brutal act of send flirtatious, but non-committal text messages aka “breadcrumbs” with the goal of luring an intimate partner without expending much effort. It’s also called “leading someone on.”

ELEVATED PURSUITS

ELEVATED PURSUITS

The best plays, musical performances and exhibits in Texas are being enjoyed by record number crowds, according to our cultural adventurer Claire-Lise Greve who shares our favorite recommendations from across the state in this issue.

AUSTIN

BROADWAY, MEET FRANCE

Coming to UT’s Bass Concert Hall in September, the Tony Award®-winning musical Les Misérables brings to life Victor Hugo’s classic story of human rights, class conflict and justice. This production took inspiration from the paintings of Victor Hugo to create a new, reimagined scenic design that captivates audiences. September 10—15. At  Austin.Broadway.com

 

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of Les Miserables US Tour

LET’S MIX IT UP

The Modernist Networks exhibition drawn from Annette Campbell-White’s collection of Modernist writers and artists, features manuscripts, books, letters, photographs, and illustrations that chart creative influences across generations, disciplines, and continents. Campbell-White’s memoir, published in conjunction with the exhibition, offers a compelling backstory to this selection of highlights from her collection. Through January 5. At HRC.utexas.edu

 

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of the Harry Ransom Center

TEXAS-SIZED AMBITION

ANN offers a glimpse into the complex and passionate life of  Ann Richards, the colorful 45th Governor of Texas. This hilarious, yet captivating play provides an intimate setting to tell the story of one of the most impressive women in modern day politics.

Through September 8. At ZachTheatre.org

 

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of ZACH Theatre

DALLAS / FORT WORTH

WHO’S REALLY THE FAIREST ONE OF THEM ALL?

Texas Ballet Theatre presents Sleeping Beauty, a story of fate, curses, and love. Performed at the Winspear Opera House, this ballet showcases stunning costumes, dazzling scenery, and wonderful music, making it perfect for the whole family.

September 6—8. At TexasBalletTheater.org

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of Texas Ballet Theater

WILL ROBOTS TAKE OVER?

The Psychedelic Robot show hosts a variety of interactive, multimedia installations from local and International artists including fashion, sculpture, painting, photography, video, music, costuming, performance and more in a 13,000 square foot venue at the Crescent Court. Through September 29. At PsychedelicRobot.com

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of Psychedelic Robot

MUSIC OF ANGELS

This sensational production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera returns to tell the story of a young ingénue who becomes entranced by her “Angel of Music” through breathtaking choreography, dazzling costumes and powerful vocals. Sept. 24—Oct. 5. At BassHall.com

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of The Phantom of the Opera Touring Company

HOUSTON

WHAT A CUT-UP

The Printing Museum’s newest installation, Paper Couture, features origami artist, Joan Son’s take on retro-inspired fashion. Son created a variety of full-sized gowns through numerous techniques he learned throughout his career as a contemporary origami artist. Through December 22. At PrintingMuseum.org

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of Printing Museum

RAZZLE DAZZLE

TUTS kicks off their 51st season with one of Broadway’s most iconic musicals at the Hobby Center. Telling the story of underpaid and overworked actors, A Chorus Line explores the timeless lives of Broadway chorus dancers. September 10—22. At Houston-Theater.com.

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of the Touring Company of A Chorus Line

LOVE, THEN DECEPTION

Houston Ballet presents Giselle, a wonderful example of a 19th-century ballet that tells the story of a peasant girl who is tricked by an aristocrat pretending to be a commoner. Featuring themes of redemption, love, and betrayal, Giselle is one of the most stunning ballets ever produced. September 6-15. At HoustonBallet.org

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of the Houston Ballet

SAN ANTONIO

KNIGHT & DAY

For the Tobin Center’s anniversary gala 10-time Grammy winner Gladys Knight will entertain in her inimitable way. A seated dinner, silent auction and after party will make this a can’t-miss event. October 24.

At TobinCenter.org

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of the Tobin Center

PAINTING FOR PERFORMANCE

Painting for Performance features designs of five different artists who have delved into the world of theatrical performance. The McNay museum’s new exhibit offers a glimpse into the technical skill that goes into creating the costumes and backdrops for many stage productions. September 12­—December 8.

At McnayArt.org

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of the McNay Art Museum

LIVING FOR THE ART

Puccini’s tragic opera Tosca tells the story of an actress who truly lived for her art before sadly falling victim to the head of the secret police. Opera San Antonio uses the marvelous sets from the esteemed Seattle Opera’s rendition to create a visually stunning production. September 12 and 14. At OperaSA.org

IMAGE: Photo courtesy of Opera San Antonio

STYLE GAZING

STYLE GAZING

Early fall’s best books to have? They’re right here, according to our resident bibliophile Lance Avery Morgan, who selects his favorites for saturating yourself in style as the weather gets cooler.

HUNKS & HEROES

By Jim Moore

This is the must-have style bible for all readers interested in men’s fashion, style, culture, and celebrity from the former editor-in-chief at GQ magazine. $75. At Rizzoli USA

SUPREME GLAMOUR

By Mary Wilson

It showcases the magnificent Mary Wilson Gown Collection that includes iconic outfits created for and worn by The Supremes, photographed especially for this book on the stage of the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles. $40. At Thames And Hudson USA.

A GREAT PARTY: DESIGNING THE PERFECT CELEBRATION

By Bryan Rafanelli

Farrow & Ball are world-renowned for their high-end paint and luxury wallpaper. Here is the wisdom for creating harmonious interiors and beautiful rooms. This is a practical guide filled with endless inspiration. $50. At Rizzoli USA.

FIONA BARRATT-CAMPBELL: ELEMENTAL

By Fiona Barratt-Campbell

From  a chic, historic townhouse in Somerset, to a beach villa in Mallorca…then to a riverside development in London and beyond, this presents the definitive master class in home design. $65. At Rizzoli USA.

CINDY SHERMAN

By Paul Moorhouse

The famous chameleon photographer has over 230 key works celebrated here and addresses her talents through the lens of portraiture and style in the era of today’s social media and selfies. $45. At Rizzoli USA.

CREATIVE PARIS: URBAN INTERIORS, INSPIRING INNOVATORS

By My Little Paris

Here is a guidebook for the city’s best-kept secrets in fashion, interiors, and lifestyle inside thirty-four homes and creative spaces that reflects Paris’s freshest interior inspiration. $35. At Rizzoli USA.

ENTERTAINING AT HOME

By Ronda Carman

This offers an insider’s view of gatherings in the homes of leading tastemakers from the worlds of interior design, architecture, culinary arts, and high societ­y–­­including Lynn Wyatt, of course. $45. At Rizzoli USA.

1950s In VOGUE

By Rebecca C. Tulte

You’ll love how this reveals a fascinating and up to now little-explored era in the history of American Vogue magazine under the 1952-1962 editorship of Jessica Daves. It features photographs, illustrations, spreads from the Vogue archives, and letters from Daves’s personal archives. $95. At Thames & Hudson.

HOLIDAY: THE BEST TRAVEL MAGAZINE THAT EVER WAS

By Pamela Fiori

It was the most glamorous travel magazine in mid-century America. Highlighted is the publication’s golden era with a blend of sparkling writing, stunning photographs, and an eclectic assortment of ephemera. $85. At Rizzoli USA.

ON STYLE

By Carl Dellatore

This sleek tome features a freshman class of 50 that hail from all over the country and are leading the charge in what’s new and next in the future of decorating. $45. At Rizzoli USA.

THE STYLE OF MOVEMENT: FASHION AND DANCE

By Ken Browar and Deborah Ory

This gorgeous volume spotlights today’s greatest dancers–from ballet to modern—dressed in clothing by today’s and yesterday’s most celebrated designers. Included are Dior, Valentino, Oscar de la Renta, and Bill Blass, to name a few $75. At Rizzoli USA.

JOHN GALLIANO FOR DIOR

By Robert Fairer

This elegantly captures the designer’s extraordinary fashions created for the House of Dior with never-before-seen images of show-stopping designs. It’s a must-own for any fashion connoisseur. $150. At Thames & Hudson USA.